Political Newsrooms: Misunderstood and Under Utilized

by / Newsroom Ink on 08/16/2016
Trump, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton have inspired voters to go to the polls. Who will win will depend on their communications team.

Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton and Trump have inspired voters to go to the polls. Who will win will depend on their communications team. Campaign Photos

by Ed Lallo/Newsroom Ink

The election of 2016 has changed the political landscape once again. The rise of  “Trump”, “I’m with Her” and “The Bern” has changed not only American politics, but also campaign strategies. The American voter   wants change, real change. Voters want candidates that are honest, informed, open and transparent.

Social media has become an effective tool in the political spectrum, giving politicians a platform to instantaneously transmit information to a large audience of voters. The problem is that message hits only a committed voter base.

Publications such as Politico have used stories and Ideas from online newsrooms.

Publications such as Politico have used stories and ideas from online newsrooms.  Writers and editors both agree that they help their coverage.

Political advisors for too long have ignored innovative trends and tools that position candidates as responsive to voter needs. In recent campaigns Twitter, Emails and Facebook have used effectively to fuel a conversation, however all are extremely limited in forming a more substantial message.

As more and more political campaigns use integrated social marketing communications to connect with targeted audiences; what most lack are a centralized content engine that drives the conversation to a higher level – a dynamic online newsroom staffed by professional journalists.

A candidate’s open and transparent newsroom should not be a place about pushing the message from the top down, but instead letting the voices of others –voters, family, political experts and media – tell the story in a way that increases the credibility the campaign. This “brand journalism” style adds balance and influence and allows stories to be told from a perspective only the candidate can offer.

The newsroom becomes the platform to portray the candidate’s thought- leadership abilities; giving him a forum – not a sound byte – to respond quickly and thoughtfully to an opponent’s position or accusation.  It provides instant access for media to obtain credible information during the campaign; told by journalists, for journalists, and illustrated with storytelling photos and video.

Voting

The political online newsroom is not a tool for every campaign, only those that want to win. It could prove to be “the” instrumental factor in deciding a political race. Photo: Ed Lallo/Newsroom Ink

Advisors, and politicians alike, have to come to the realization that the online newsroom is the factory that runs the campaign’s content engine. The newsroom needs to become the place to address campaign issues, perform crisis management as well as integrate social media.

The newsroom not only aligns social media, but also the campaign’s traditional media – public relations, advertising and communications – to the candidate’s agenda. It is the one place that 24-hours a day voters, legislators, campaign staff and opponents; as well as local, national and international media; can obtain stories, photos and videos all told from your unique perspective.

The political online newsroom is not a tool for every campaign, only those that want to win. Properly staffed, it is a cost effective campaign tool that could prove to be “the” instrumental factor in deciding a political race.


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